Have you ever thought about what makes a good student versus a skilled, lifelong learner?


Most schools focus on studying material, completing homework, participating in class; in other words, academic engagement. We expect those who enroll to be academically engaged, good students. Our task—and our joy—is lighting the fire of intellectual engagement: grappling with ideas, finding intrinsic motivation, and seeking ways to apply knowledge and skills to solve problems in our world. The level of challenge is also important: we don’t want students to be either bored or anxious, but find the right balance that encourages engagement in their own learning.

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Academic News

List of 2 news stories.

  • Unnathy Nellutla ’19 Accepted to Iowa Young Writers’ Studio

    Senior Unnathy Nellutla was accepted to the 2019 Iowa Young Writers’ Studio, a highly selective two-week summer residential program that gives promising young creative writers the opportunity to share their writing with teachers and peers, receive constructive critique, participate in writing exercises and activities, and attend readings and literary events. Previous Newark Academy participants include Ezra Lebovitz ’18, Betsy Zaubler ’17, Elizabeth Merrigan ’16 and Flannery James ’14. Earlier this year Unnathy was nominated by Scholastic Art & Writing Award judges as one of five nominees from the the state of New Jersey for a Scholastic American Voices Medal. She is looking forward to attending the workshop in Iowa this summer.
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  • NA Class of 2019 Cum Laude Society

    Founded in 1906, the Cum Laude society was created to recognize superior academic achievement, as are captured in three Greek words: arete, dike, and time—excellence, justice, and honor. Implicit in all three terms is a sense of balance, fitness, beauty and goodness. This is seen in students who have fallen in love with ideas, and who delight in sharing those ideas with others. The following members of the senior class have been recognized for their outstanding academic contributions to our community:
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